Vermont Had Just 2 Bump Stocks Handed in During Amnesty Period (VIDEO)

 

Two styles of bump fire stocks, mounted on firearms, are shown in this file image. (Photo: Slide Fire Solutions)

State Police offered a no-questions-asked surrender on the devices last month but had few takers.

Vermont authorities in September said they were are not offering to pay for the now-banned devices but did warn those caught with them after Oct. 1 that they could risk up to one year in prison and $1,000 in fines. Now that the new law outlawing the devices has gone into effect, it turns out that VSP’s haul of relinquished bump fire stocks could fit on a table top.

State Police spokesman Adam Silverman said that as of Tuesday just two of the devices had been turned in statewide. Both stocks, as reported by My Champlain Valley.com, will be taken to state police headquarters in Waterbury to be destroyed. Officials have previously clarified that only the stocks were to be accepted during the grace period, detached from any firearm.

Gun rights groups warn that those turning in such items moving forward could open themselves up to jail time and fines. It is not just Vermont that has seen poor compliance with statewide bans on the devices. With as many as 520,000 bump stocks in circulation nationwide and few jurisdictions willing to pay for them, only a trickle are finding their way to authorities.

Seven months after Denver outlawed the devices, none had been handed over to police in Colorado’s largest city. Similar results are reported in New Jersey while in Massachusetts, the first state to ban them since their use in the Las Vegas shooting last October, numbers of relinquished bump stocks are in the single digits.

Besides the ban on bump stocks, a measure to limit magazine capacity also took effect this week in Vermont, a move that has some gun retailers stuck with now-unsellable merchandise taking a loss.

“When I came into work this morning, I wasn’t feeling all that good looking on the wall and seeing all the inventory and the money that I’ve tied up. Now we can’t do anything with it,” Jim Dattilio, the owner of Dattilio’s Guns & Tackle, told NBC5, saying a lot of his clientele is pulling stumps for other, more friendly, states.

Both the magazine ban and bump stock ban, as well as the state’s new restriction on those under age 21 buying rifles and shotguns, are the subject of a legal challenge.

This article was syndicated from Guns.com Guns.com is a niche news web site that publishes original reporting on the wide range of topics within the gun world. We publish Monday through Saturday. Our approach is to explore the topic of guns through the widest lens possible, to deliver these findings as fairly and accurately as possible and to host the opinions and perspectives of our writers and readers as selflessly as possible, trying our best not to get in the way of our contributors. Our desire is to allow our writers and readers to tell their stories, no matter what the story is, as long as we believe a) it will benefit or interest gun owners and b) conforms to ethical journalistic methods and practices. Our headquarters are in Illinois but our contributors submit to us from across the United States — from Maine to California, from Texas to Alaska and every state in between.