Super Dynamic Combat (SD-C) Trigger Review

 

We have reviewed some of the ALG Defense products in the past like the rails and ACT trigger they make. Their parent company Geissele was kind enough to send us out a Super Dynamic Combat Trigger commonly referred to as the SD-C Trigger.

The SDC is a completely flat trigger, which creates a feel that is different from a conventional trigger. The pull weight of a curved trigger and a flat trigger can be set to the same weight, but due to leverage the flat will “feel” lighter. There is also a perceived ability to shoot straighter dues to the angle of pull using the flat trigger instead of hooking it.

Your mileage may vary, and some of the responses I have seen on forums may be a placebo affect. All I can tell you is my opinion. I like the flat trigger but I have no issue with curved triggers. I would not buy a gun or trigger “just” because it is flat. The other elements such as weight, reset and pull make more of a difference. That said if all elements are equal as you can find in several of the Geissele triggers I would take the flat.

So what features does this trigger sport that make it command a price of $230. 00

  • Type: 2-stage
  • 1st Stage Weight: 2.5lbs.
  • 2nd Stage Weight: 2.0lbs.
  • Total Pull Weight: 4.5lbs.
  • Adjustable: No
  • Recommended Use: LEO, HD, and Hunting.
  • Pin Size: Mil-Spec
  • All weights are approximates

If you’re new to triggers and are not sure what the difference is in a 2-stage vs. single stage trigger let me try and break it down simply.

Single Stage- weight required to pull and break the trigger is consistent from start to finish. This can cause the shooter to tense during precision shots over longer distances, leading to missing or sub MOA shots.

2-stage – The initial weight needed to pull the trigger is higher than the amount needed to achieve the break. Since the heavier weight is taken up prior to the shot and the weight to break the trigger is lower. The shooter’s hands and body can be more relaxed at the time of the break keeping the gun on target.

Why not just get a lighter single stage? Well, many competition shooters do. However in the field or during a home defense situation the lighter triggers can create an added level of danger. AD’s and ND’s get more common with lighter triggers as the room for error is reduced.

2-stage triggers give users the protection of a heavier trigger with a lighter break for precision shots. As you can see in the specs, the SD-C is recommended for LEO, Home Defense and Hunting due to the safety of a high stress heavy initial pull and clean light break for distance shots.

 

We could not think of a better rifle to test this trigger in, than our Daniel Defense M4A1/14.5” Socom Rifle. With a Trijicon AccuPoint TR20G Scope sitting on a LaRue SPR-1.5 flat top mount.

We compared the SD-c trigger vs. a Mil-Spec trigger that came with the Daniel Defense Rifle. This allows us to establish a clean baseline on the rifle. All tests were done on the same exact rifle with only the triggers being changed out.

Test One Mil Spec Trigger:

Shooting the rifle with the Mil-Spec trigger coming from Daniel Defense wasn’t bad to begin with. The standard Mil-Spec trigger after a few thousand rounds has a nice way of smoothing out, and this was a well broken in trigger.

Shooting in the prone position, we started at 100 meters with five shots grouped about the size of a quarter. At 200 and 300 meters we fired 10 shots at each distance on a 4” steel plate. Using the DBW 223/5.56 75 Grain BTHP, with a velocity of 2800FPS and Muzzle Energy of 1300 Ft-lbs.

Groupings were on par with my skill level generating consistent hits. Though the trigger was not gritty the heavy pull made these longer shots a bit more difficult.

 

We installed the Geissele SD-C trigger. It is a very easy installation, even for those who have never installed one. Easy to follow directions included or if still unsure of installing one watch the below YouTube video.

 

We began the same testing process again using the SD-C as we had done with the Mil-Spec trigger. Starting out at 100m we fired 5 shots and a quarter covered the holes.

We took it back to 200 meters for 10 shots on a 4” plate in the prone position. With the 2-stage trigger releasing the trigger only enough to activate the reset made for a very fast and light 2nd shot.

We then moved out to 300 meters shooting 10 shots at the 4” steel plate in the prone position. Having the 2-stage trigger takes more pressure off your hand and finger. This reduction in force on the grip allows for better gun control leading to more accurate and tighter groups.

Pros:

  • The flat trigger makes the pull feel lighter than it is
  • Follow up shots are quicker due to the positive reset and reduced 2nd stage pull.
  • Easy Installation
  • On the SD-C, it is easier to get a straight pull back. Sometimes on the SSA when I’m not pulling straight back I will shoot to the left a hair

Cons:

  • Cost
  • If you haven’t used a 2-stage trigger before it will take practice to get the full benefit.
  • Some may not like the flat trigger over the cradle a curved trigger provides your finger. Geissele offers the SSA for you if thats more your speed.

Source Article from http://248shooter.com/index.php/super-dynamic-combat-sd-c-trigger-by-geissele/

Charles is the editor for 248 Shooter a midwest based gun news and gear review site as well as Online Content Director for On Target Magazine. He is an avid student taking classes from top tier trainers around the country. Charles shares his love for training as well as experience and opinions on some of the most talked about gear and products used by competitive shooters, military, leo and civilians.