Ruger issues safety bulletin on American Pistol over slide cracks

 

Sturm, Ruger & company announced that some Ruger American Pistols that have fired more than 10,000 rounds may exhibit premature wear that can result in a slide crack.

The bulletin, issued this week, cautions that the problem could surface on both duty and compact-sized models in 9mm with serial number prefixes “860” and “862” while stressing that other 9mm pistols such as the SR9 and LC9S are not affected. A sign that the gun may fall inside this range is a silver-colored, stainless steel barrel.

The root of the problem, which can be found during what Ruger stresses in routine maintenance, is premature wear of the locking surfaces between the slide and barrel. The company says that if such excessive wear is not observed, no action is necessary, but owners of such pistols can sign up for a free retrofit if they suspect such an issue could be developing.

Should the wear be ignored, it can result in a crack near the ejection port of the slide. “If cracking occurs, it will become visible long before an unsafe condition develops,” Ruger said. “However, if the crack is not addressed and the pistol remains in service, the pistol may eventually fail to function or become unsafe to shoot.”

Those participating in the retrofit will receive a prepaid USPS box to return the slide/barrel assembly to have new components installed as needed free of charge. Ruger said they will make “every effort” to return the assembly within a week of the day they receive it.

This article was syndicated from Guns.com Guns.com is a niche news web site that publishes original reporting on the wide range of topics within the gun world. We publish Monday through Saturday. Our approach is to explore the topic of guns through the widest lens possible, to deliver these findings as fairly and accurately as possible and to host the opinions and perspectives of our writers and readers as selflessly as possible, trying our best not to get in the way of our contributors. Our desire is to allow our writers and readers to tell their stories, no matter what the story is, as long as we believe a) it will benefit or interest gun owners and b) conforms to ethical journalistic methods and practices. Our headquarters are in Illinois but our contributors submit to us from across the United States — from Maine to California, from Texas to Alaska and every state in between.