Rossi Introduces New Rio Bravo .22LR Lever Gun

 

Rossi bills that the Rio Bravo is suited for small-game hunting, target shooting, pest control, and youth training. (Photos: Rossi)

Rossi this month announced their new Rio Bravo lever-action rimfire rifle, based on their popular R92 series cowboy guns, chambered in .22 LR.

The hammer-fired rifle has an under-barrel magazine tube that holds up to 15 rounds of .22LR and is fed in much the same way as the familiar Marlin Model 60. With an 18-inch barrel, the overall length of the Rio Bravo is a handy 36-inches. Weight is 5.5-pounds and the carbine includes a cross-bolt safety and sling studs.

Rossi Rio Bravo rifle, two views in lightbox

The traditional version of the Rossi Rio Bravo uses German beechwood furniture and has buckhorn sights. (Photo: Rossi)

Rossi plans on offering the Rio Bravo in two different versions. A traditional model, with German beechwood furniture rather than the company’s traditional Brazilian hardwood used on their other cowboy guns, will have buckhorn sights. A subsequent model with synthetic furniture will have a fiber optic front sight with an adjustable rear.

MSRP on the Rossi Rio Bravo .22 LR lever gun is $346.97, a price likely to drop into the ~$290s with retailers. It is not clear if the price for the synthetic/fiber-optic variant will be different.

Rossi firearms, a Taurus subsidiary, are increasingly manufactured at the company’s new Bainbridge, Georgia facility, although it is not known if the Rio Bravo will be produced in the Peachtree State.

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