Lumber Crayon – A Discreet Stabber

Discreet carry weapons have a special place in my heart. The majority of us prefer to keep our weapons concealed and hidden when necessary. Knives, guns, nunchucks, and such can be effectively concealed, but sometimes the best way to conceal a weapon is to carry one so invisible you carry it openly, and no one would ever notice. The GLG Knifeworks Lumber Crayon is one such weapon. 

If you have never been a carpenter, you may have never used a lumber crayon or lumber pencil. These are wide rectangular pencils that are used to draw straight and easy lines to make accurate cuts and fitments on wood. They are weird pencils essentially, and the GLG Knifeworks Lumber Crayon looks like a weird pencil, but it doesn’t write. 

The Lumber Crayon 

It stabs, shivs, shanks, and generally makes an attacker feel more uncomfortable and leaky. The GLG Knifeworks Lumber Crayon is made entirely from G-10. G-10 is a fiberglass laminate originally used for printer circuit boards. It’s become a popular material for numerous tools, including gun and knife grips, because it’s easy to texture and mold. G-10 is the strongest of the glass fiber resin laminates, and when you are planning to stick it into someone’s face, that’s important. 

The genius of a device like this is that it looks and feels like a pencil. I could carry this in my hand or tucked behind my ear, and no one would be the wiser. The lack of metal in the design makes it undetectable, albeit you shouldn’t violate any legal weapon-free zones with it. Some weapon-free zones have no legal bearing but are enforced via a metal detector. That is not a problem with the lumber crayon. It’s disguised and painted realistically in the handle, tip, and lead portion. 

Why Not a Normal Pencil? 

The Lumber Crayon is 6.75 inches long from tip to butt and a hair over half an inch wide. That seems larger than it needs to be, right? Why not just make a G-10 pencil. A lumber crayon stands out a little bit more than a standard pencil, and it’s a good question. The Lumber Crayon design was used because the extra width and berth give you two things, strength and grip. 

The wider and bulkier design gives you a stronger tool. This is a pokey impact weapon, and when you drive the tool into a soft or hard target, there is always the risk it will break. The stronger a tool like this is, the better, and being wider makes it stronger. 

Near the tip, the design is considerably thicker than a normal pencil, and this reinforcement in this critical area is an absolute must. Remember, it’s just the tip doing most of the work. 

The wider, more rectangular body is easier to grip and drive into a threat. If you stab something, your hands will likely get a little bloody, and then things just get slick, and you’ll want that extra grip. 

In Use

The tip is quite pokey, and I wouldn’t suggest tossing this in a pocket without something covering the tip. It’s likely to dig a hole in your jeans as you walk, and that’s not great. That tip is awfully sharp and will its job when it comes time to stick, stab, and poke. 

The design allows for both an ice pick style grip and a standard grip. With your thumb over the rear of the Lumber Crayon, an ice pick grip feels like the most stable. Since you won’t be cutting with this thing, an ice pick grip makes a lot of sense. Drive a tool like this downwards into your target is more powerful than a standard stab. 

The Lumber Crayon is a simple tool that appeals to your caveman-like brain when in use. It’s sharp, easy to grip, and robust in design. It’s also discreet; you could say it’s downright deceitful. Check out GLG Knifeworks for more discreet designs and get your hands on a Lumber Crayon.