How 3-Gun Competitions Keep You In Shape and Mentally Sharp

Guns.com visited the Zombies in the Heartland 3-Gun match where we were able to catch up with professional shooters and amateurs alike to ask them about the sport and how it can help you stay in shape. 3-Gun competition is unique in that you use three different shooting platforms, but just like a lot of other shooting sports it gets you off the shooting line and moving around. “It’s a pretty physical endeavor… if you want to shoot open and you at to race really hard you have to be in shape,” said Jerry Miculek.

It’s not just the physical limits you’ll be pushing, it’s as much a mental game as it is a physical one. “It’s running and gunning, your cognitive skills are all tested. Thinking ahead of all the targets… its agility training with the memory of everything,” said Dave Smith a.k.a. Shakey Dave the Parkinsons Shooter. Competitors will typically walk through the course of fire and spend a few minutes planning their shots. Then, just like a game a memory they need to repeat that sequence all while maintaining safe firearms practice.

Overall 3-Gun shooting competitions are a great way to keep the “ball bearings rolling,” as Miculek told us. The other great thing about this sport is you don’t have to be some spring chicken to compete. It’s something where you can keep competing as you get older, this is reflective of the diverse range of ages you’ll see at a match. “[3-Gun] is something I found later in life that I can still do and be competitive,” said Lance Dingler, professional shooter.

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