Gunsmith shares grossly neglected semi-auto pistol with the world (PHOTOS)

If the inside of your handgun looks like the trunk of a junkyard Buick, you may have some issues with reliability. (Photos: D&D)

Troy, Michigan’s D&D Gunsmiths have seen the proverbial elephant when it comes to poor gun maintenance and decided to post a cautionary tale to the gun community at large.

In a post last week detailing an amazingly dirty semi-auto handgun that came to them in unworking condition, the shop made clear where they stood on regular gun cleaning.

“The guy’s complaint was he couldn’t take it apart that is his day-to-day carry,” said the shop. “That’s what happens when you put the gun in your jacket pocket all of the time or in a hoodie pocket or slide it into your pants for like a decade.”

In short, a true “You failed to maintain your weapon, son” moment.

With over 200 comments, speculation ran heavy that the gun was stored in a dryer lint screen (just in case), or perhaps in an ant hill or wood chipper. The heavy accumulation of particulate in every moving part took some special time and attention — to include an overnight soak and complete strip down — by the staff at D&D to clear.

In the end, it was a night and day difference.

clean gun slide and frame

Note the large bag of dirt which was scraped out to return to the handgun to working condition.

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