Gear in the Wild: Training to respond to chemical attacks in Florida

U.S. Army Spc. Nicholas Threatte, a chemical decontamination specialist and a native of Darlington, South Carolina, checks radiation levels on a simulated victim of a chemical attack during a training exercise at Homestead Miami Speedway, Homestead, Florida. Operation Homestead ’19 was held on January 24, 2019. Spc. Threatte is assigned to the Army Reserve 413th Chemical Company, 457th Chemical Battalion, 415th Chemical Brigade, Task Force 76,

Nearly 300 Army Reserve soldiers assigned to Task Force 76 joined with more than 100 personnel from the Miami-Dade Fire Department and several other civilian agencies. They spent the day conducting a variety of joint search and rescue, chemical decontamination and medical treatment training at the speedway. The goal was to enhance inter-agency integration, communications, and response capabilities while building a seamless transition between local first responders and the follow-on support provided by state and federal forces in response to a catastrophic man-made or natural disaster.

U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Brent C. Powell

See how the U.S. military trains for nuclear, biological, or chemical attacks below: