B-17 Flying Fortress opens bomb bays and drops…wingsuits (VIDEO)

FullMag and a group of wingsuiters and skydivers took a ride on a historic B-17G but released themselves on their own recognizance.

Flying out of Tooele Valley Airport outside of Salt Lake City, the group took to the air, climbed to altitude, cranked open the bomb bay doors, and took a walk, so to speak.

The B-17, which first flew in 1935, was the primary heavy bomber used by the U.S. during WWII and, while over 12,000 were built, less than 70 survive today and few of those are still airworthy. The G-model carried a baker’s dozen M2 .50 caliber machine guns in addition to up to four tons of bombs.

German map of coverage of the firing arcs of a B-17 Flying Fortress. Some 8,000 B-17s were lost in combat or training, but they were a daunting challenge for any enemy fighter pilot (Photo: Lone Sentry)

German map of coverage of the firing arcs of a B-17 Flying Fortress. Some 8,000 B-17s were lost in combat or training, but they were a daunting challenge for any enemy fighter pilot. (Photo: Lone Sentry)

Also, keep in mind that this week is the 73rd anniversary of the landings at D-Day on the Normandy coast, an invasion that was supported by hundreds of bomber sorties.

Source Article from http://www.guns.com/2017/06/07/b-17-flying-fortress-opens-bomb-bays-and-drops-wingsuits-video/

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