A Convenient Pocket Light – Fenix LD30

The Fenix LD30 is an extremely powerful compact flashlight that can blast a maximum 1600 lumens, 673 feet (205 meters). At only 4.3” long, the LD30 is the perfect size everyday carry EDC flashlight. Quickly activate the flashlight with its tactical tail switch and then cycle through the lighting modes with the side switch. The LD30 flashlight is powered by one 18650 li-ion battery or two CR123As. Other features include a two-position body clip, battery level indicator, and it is IP68 rated waterproof/dustproof.

That’s the official line from Fenix.

In the practical it is a small, comfortable, and highly functional little pocket light that is great for the everyday tasks that require a variably practical level of light.

I am not overly fond of strobe lights, but a selectable light for swapping between low light searching for an item and bright light for searching at distance or direct tactical use, that is certainly a desirable product. The control scheme is straight forward and the switch system makes sense.

The light remains at the last setting selected, at that is that. A Red/Green LED for battery levels, button for setting change, plugs into a USB to charge, and anything from low lumen looking about at night in a campsite to a brilliant beam to assess a potential threat in the darkness. Easy.

If I have a single nitpick about the light, it is the one that all high output LED lights share, it gets really stinking hot when set on high and left on. Not a huge problem for short durations, and high is usually a short duration deal, and not a huge problem when not being held… But this is a held light, so limiting the time in the hand on high (especially around the LED head) is highly recommended.

Check it out here.

Keith Finch
Keith is the Editor-in-Chief of GAT Marketing Group editor@gatdaily.com A USMC Infantry Veteran and Small Arms and Artillery Technician, Keith covers the evolving training and technology from across the shooting industry. A Certified Instructor since 2009 he has taught concealed weapons courses in the West Michigan area in the years since and continues to pursue training and teaching opportunities as they arise.