Dallas Police Phase Out Last Revolvers

For years, the K-frame Smith in its various formats was the go-to duty gun for police nationwide. 

The Dallas Police Department has been switching from wheel guns to semi-autos since 1990, and its now the end of the road for the last holdouts.

As reported by NBC-DFW, there were only five DPD officers still carrying revolvers earlier this month and, by mandatory policy, they migrated to pistols this week. Some veteran officers who have transitioned missed the old .38.

“It kind of hurt,” Jerry Rhodes, a current reserve officer who has been on the force since 1973. “It kind of hurt from the standpoint of nostalgia. From the standpoint of that I felt very comfortable shooting my revolver.”

Rhodes said he intends to pass on his retired gun, saying, “I want my grandsons to have it.”

Nonetheless, the Dallas officers will not be the last local lawmen to keep the tradition alive. Local media reports that about 40 county bailiffs, as well as an officer in Plano, still carry revolvers.

Meanwhile, on the federal level, the six-shooter is far from dead, with a 2018 GAO report detailing that in recent years at least three agencies—NPPD, ICE, and the U.S. Secret Service—have bought revolvers for use by agents.

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